Put HERstory into history

Educational resources highlighting the experiences of servicewomen

Lesson Plans

And Still, They Served

And Still, They Served: Black Servicewomen in World War II examines the critical roles that Black servicewomen play in the U.S. Armed Forces during World War II.

One Small Step For Women

Explore the contributions of servicewomen in support roles during the Space Race through the collection of Pearl Tucker, the Mother of aerospace nursing. Students will analyze primary sources and use critical thinking and discussion to explore various aspects of the Space Race, including the role of aerospace nurses, and consider the costs and viability of the space program.

Service & Society

This program examines women’s military service in the years following World War II with a focus on the Women’s Army Corps.

Request A Tour

Visiting the Memorial? We offer free overview tours of the Military Women’s Memorial. Take a journey through HERstory from the American Revolution through both World Wars, the Korean War, Vietnam and the war on terrorism. How and where have women served?

Time: 45 minutes

When: During regular operating hours

Cost: Free

Minimum notice: We require 2 weeks advance notice to schedule a tour guide.

To request: Email [email protected].org to request a tour. Please allow up to 2 business days for response.

And Still, They Served: Black Servicewomen in World War II

Nearly 9,000 African American women served throughout the United States and in England under racially segregated and discriminatory conditions. Black servicewomen trained in all-Black units and were permitted only to compose a certain enlistment quota. They served largely in support roles and in positions of menial and manual labor. They were barred from the same advancement opportunities given to white women and almost entirely prohibited from serving overseas. And still, they served.

Grades 6-12

1-2 Class Periods

Meets standards of learning in history and social studies for Common Core, Virginia and the National Council for the Social Studies Standards.

This lesson plan, resource packet and presentation resource was created in part with the Military Women’s Memorial exhibit: The Color of Freedom.

Lesson Plan

Resource Packet

One Small Step For Women: American Servicewomen in the Space Race

This program examines the contributions of American servicewomen to the Space Race. From the late 1950s through the 1960s, the United States engaged in the Space Race against the Soviet Union, each trying to become the first country to put a man on the moon. The US and Soviet Union believed that having such capabilities would demonstrate a technological advantage over the other. NASA formed in 1958 to oversee aeronautical and space programs. President John F. Kennedy cemented America’s determination to win the Space Race in a 1962 speech in which he vowed to go to the moon by the end of the decade, demonstrating the importance of the Space Race to foreign policy. 

Early American astronauts were all men who had a military background. NASA decided not to allow women to become astronauts during this period. Although they were excluded from spaceflight, women contributed to the Space Race in supporting roles, including aerospace nursing.  

Grades 6-12

1 class period

Meets standards of learning in history and social studies for Common Core, Virginia and the National Council for the Social Studies Standards.

Service & Society: Recruiting Women in Postwar America

This program examines women’s military service in the years following World War II with a focus on the Women’s Army Corps. Soon after the war ended in 1945, the Armed Forces demobilized most of the 350,000 women who had served during the war. Within a couple of years, however, they sought to bring women back into the ranks. Unlike in the months after America’s entry into World War II, women did not flock to recruiting offices. What deterred women from answering Uncle Sam’s call? How did mid-century values compete with women’s service? Low enlistment numbers and the need to recruit women led to key changes in the military- the permanent integration of women and racial desegregation. Although met with resistance, these measures paved the way toward more gender and racial equality.

Grades 9-12

1-2 Class Periods

Meets standards of learning in history and social studies for Common Core, Virginia and the National Council for the Social Studies Standards.

Location

MEMORIAL AVE & SCHLEY DR
ARLINGTON, VA 22203

Hours of Operation

MON – SAT
9:00am – 5:00pm

SUN
12:00pm – 5:00pm

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